Meet the 14-year-old fashion designer from North Potomac

Wearing one of her own designs, Chloe Ayissi-Etoh is surrounded by clothing she created in her at-home studio. Photo by Michael Ventura

A year ago, Chloe Ayissi-Etoh didn’t know how to sew. But this spring, in a school auditorium packed with more than 900 people, the teen soaked in thunderous applause as a bona fide fashion designer.

In a red dress she’d finished perfecting just minutes earlier, Chloe followed models who’d walked the stage at Walter Johnson High School in Bethesda in nine looks from her first collection, under her brand chlolanà—a blend of her first name and middle name, Alana.

For Chloe, an eighth grader at the time, the fashion show was a major accomplishment. What made it even more impressive was that she’d had just four weeks to design, sew and fit the dresses, pants, shirts and corsets she’d sketched for various body types. The show was

Laredoan has designs featured by international fashion company

One native Laredoan has taken a huge step in their fashion career as their work is being featured in a Famous Footwear fashion campaign thanks to a partnership with their university and British footwear and clothing brand Dr. Martens.

Jude Hinojosa is a fashion designer and artist hailing from the Laredo area. Recently Hinojosa had the opportunity to feature their designs in Dr. Martens’ All Access Summer campaign. This allowed them to take their designs and career to a new level while they finish their masters’ degree program at Central Saint Martins in London.

Hinojosa was one of the five students chosen for the opportunity.

As a Gateway City native, Hinojosa has explored their culture and taste for music in efforts to craft several fashionwear items that have landed them an opportunity for their clothing to go international. The designs featured in the campaign are based on their memories from

Paper or Prada?: Fashion designer creates gown of newspapers to stand as testament to fashion, creative expression

Lashanda White-Owens

Twenty dollars worth of newspapers and a vision were the only things local fashion designer Lashanda White-Owens needed to create a statement piece worthy of rivaling the most eccentric fashion icons.

Lady Gaga may have ridden into the 2013 American Music Awards on a fake white horse in a Versace dress, but even the fashion legend herself has never worn a dress made entirely of newspapers and tape.

White-Owens, a Noxubee County native, moved to Columbus in 2009. She briefly worked for a construction company before devoting herself to her husband, children and a passion for sewing.

“I have been sewing for six years now,” White-Owens said. “Two years ago, I got more serious about it and started making handmade fashion.”

As a young fashion designer with a knack for entrepreneurship, White-Owens opened her own business, Luxe Code by Shun White, in 2019.

With a new space to

Fashion Designer Dan McLean Is Seattle’s Favorite Bootlegger




It’s a problem straight from an early-aughts fashion magazine. You’re desperate for a Juicy Couture necklace—like, everyone at your school has one!—but your parents totally won’t go for it. Do you:

A. Give up—maybe they have a point about not needing expensive jewelry.
B. Resort to begging—your reputation is worth more than your dignity.
C. Take apart your Juicy key chain and turn it into a necklace—resourcefulness is next to coutureliness.

For Dan McLean, the decision was simple. She wore that key chain necklace until the Juicy logo wore off.




Now, the Seattle fashion designer makes money selling pieces born of that formative experience: random thrifted bags adorned with emblems from big fashion houses like Yves Saint Laurent; vintage button-downs cropped and enhanced with a Dior elastic waistband. She calls it “bootleg,” but these garments are a far cry from cheaply made, back-alley

Nurse Jawana Evans owns Werthe by Jem

BROCKTON — During the pandemic, Jawanda Evans spent her free time dabbling in her childhood hobby of sewing clothing, which led to the opening of Werthé by Jem.

The showroom located at 33 Dover St., Suite 303, was once a thought that was transformed into an actual clothing business.

The self-taught custom fashion designer started her journey at 11. Evans’s family taught her the basics of sewing and her talent developed over time.

In 2013, after a back injury while working in a hospital as a nurse left her on rest, Evans, 35, began traveling down memory lane and indulging in an old craft.

“I spent most of the whole pandemic sewing face masks. It was almost like a sweatshop where I had my entire family helping. We sewed thousands of masks during that time,” Evans said.

The sewing did not stop there. Evans began exploring different ways to express